10 Times an Hour

Can I find good Christian music? Is Christian music awesome? Should I worship God?

Some people never learn.

The point of the gospel is to share it. Some churches never quite get around to helping people share their faith…so they completely miss the point. Here’s another example of someone missing the point:

‘Call My Name’ is the best upbeat radio song from Third Day, ever. I’d play it ten times an hour if I could!

Bob Thornton from Tulsa’s KXOJ

With all due respect to Bob Thornton (and I do respect him), it’s a good thing he can’t play it 10 times an hour. That would ruin a good thing.

Those of you who’ve listened to Christian radio for years know what I’m talking about. Ray Boltz would’ve sold a lot more albums if people hadn’t gotten sick of his music…and it’s not Ray’s fault. Blame it on the folks at your local (or syndicated) radio station.

The point of Christian radio is to play music that people want to hear. After hearing the same really great song several squillion times, people start changing the station. That makes Christian radio, too often, an annoyance instead of a blessing.

Here’s a (very) partial list of incredibly awesome songs that I hope to be able to enjoy at some unknown point in the future…that Christian radio has beaten to death:

Unfortunately, I could go on and on. Butterfly Kisses. Seize the Day. I Can Only Imagine. He’s My Son. Shout to the Lord. That one Jake song they played on the radio. Half of Keith Green’s discography. The four Acappella songs they played. The Kirby Man. In Christ Alone. Friends. God of Wonders.

See? I could go on and on. The better a song is, the more it gets played…which makes some sense. The problem is that the song rotation on most Christian radio stations is built on some sort of fog-inducing algorithm that repeats good songs ad infinitum and excludes too many great songs.

I love Christian radio, but I’m frustrated at how much really good music has been ruined for me over the years. What about you? Which songs do you have trouble hearing? Do you think most program directors care about this problem?