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Articles about False Teachings

Christianity has always had false teachers. Today, these false teachers seem to be everywhere. Most are famous, whether on TV or radio, in books or on the internet. My goal is not to attack any individuals, but to examine their claims about God, truth, and reality. Before reading about any individual, please take the time to read What is a False Teacher?

Like clockwork, not a week goes by without someone writing to either ask whether David Jeremiah is a false teacher, or to recommend him as a reliable teacher of Scripture. This article will not satisfy either group, but it’s the best I can do at this moment.
I'm often asked to assess those who call themselves 'apostles' or 'prophets.' My opinion is irrelevant, of course. The question is whether anyone today should use those terms for themselves. In this article, I focus on the 'apostle' part of the five-fold ministry, to clear up the questions about modern-day apostles.
A lot of people believe in the 'law of attraction.' It's been promoted by people like Robert Schuller and Oprah Winfrey, and it's the foundational idea behind most Word of Faith preachers. What is it? How does it work, if it works at all? Should Christians study it?
Most businesses and churches and non-profits would love to rank #1. For anything. Most don't even rank #1 for their own name! A lot of companies pay a lot of money to try to reach #1. They pay fly-by-night SEO agencies. They pay local ad agencies who don't know much about how the web works. They also pay big money to big agencies full of experts in the field, hoping to rank well enough to get just a bit more traffic than they would naturally get.

Pastor Chris Oyakhilome is the president of LoveWorld Incorporated, also known as Christ Embassy, based in Lagos, Nigeria. He holds conferences around the world with a specific focus on healing. He operates an "International School of Healing," and is undoubtedly a false teacher.

Sally asked about Kenneth Copeland's teaching on "the law of faith," where he cites Mark 11:12-24. In that passage, Jesus cursed a fig tree and it withered. He points to this passage as an example of using words to change reality, and suggests that we can do the same. Is he right?

I'm happy to see that you're looking for a second opinion on whether anyone, including Hank Hanegraaff, is a false teacher. That's wise. This article is based on an email exchange and is a work in progress. It's designed to continue the conversation about false teachers, not to end it.

Unfortunately, Myles Munroe was a false teacher. I don’t say that gladly. He was by all accounts a happy man, an engaging speaker, and a skilled leader of leaders. He could have done much more for the Kingdom of God had he clearly taught what we find in the Scriptures. Instead, Myles Munroe taught heretical Word of Faith doctrines.

The Word of Faith movement is a pseudo-Christian cult. While there is no central authority in the Word of Faith movement, and no official set of beliefs, adherents share a set of basic unbiblical beliefs about God, the nature of the universe, the nature of humanity, and more.

Steven Furtick is a very popular speaker, a gifted communicator, and – based on the growth of his congregations – likely a gifted leader as well. He has a great amount of influence and a worldwide audience. Of course, those have nothing to do with whether he’s a false teacher.

I've spent a lot of time listening to Joseph Prince. I like the guy. Unfortunately, I feel the need to caution most believers to avoid listening to him.

If Christianity is true - and I'm convinced that it is - then everyone who teaches something different is incorrect. That doesn't mean that every non-Christian is a false teacher.

The Bible has a lot to say about false teachers. Apparently, it was a serious problem in the first century. It's a serious problem today as well. How can we identify false teachers?

The New Apostolic Reformation (NAR) is a movement made up of a number of like-minded people who call themselves Christian, but share a number of unbiblical ideas. Most NAR teachers are also Word of Faith teachers, another decidedly unbiblical set of ideas.

The KJVO controversy is about whether Christians should consider only the King James Version of the Bible to be reliable and trustworthy. While there are a variety of views within the KJVO movement, the basic idea is simple: no other Bible will do.

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