Articles about False Teachings

Christianity has always had false teachers. Today, these false teachers seem to be everywhere. Most are famous, whether on TV or radio, in books or on the internet. My goal is not to attack any individuals, but to examine their claims about God, truth, and reality.

Unfortunately, Myles Munroe was a false teacher. I don’t say that gladly. He was by all accounts a happy man, an engaging speaker, and a skilled leader of leaders. He could have done much more for the Kingdom of God had he clearly taught what we find in the Scriptures. Instead, Myles Munroe taught heretical Word of Faith doctrines.

The Word of Faith movement is a pseudo-Christian cult. While there is no central authority in the Word of Faith movement, and no official set of beliefs, adherents share a set of basic unbiblical beliefs about God, the nature of the universe, the nature of humanity, and more.

What is The Passion Bible? Is it a good Bible? Is it a good translation? Well... no. It's not.

Steven Furtick is a very popular speaker, a gifted communicator, and – based on the growth of his congregations – likely a gifted leader as well. He has a great amount of influence and a worldwide audience. Of course, those have nothing to do with whether he’s a false teacher.

I've spent a lot of time listening to Joseph Prince. I like the guy. Unfortunately, I feel the need to caution most believers to avoid listening to him.

If Christianity is true - and I'm convinced that it is - then everyone who teaches something different is incorrect. That doesn't mean that every non-Christian is a false teacher.

The Bible has a lot to say about false teachers. Apparently, it was a serious problem in the first century. It's a serious problem today as well. How can we identify false teachers?

The New Apostolic Reformation (NAR) is a movement made up of a number of like-minded people who call themselves Christian, but share a number of unbiblical ideas. Most NAR teachers are also Word of Faith teachers, another decidedly unbiblical set of ideas.

The KJVO controversy is about whether Christians should consider only the King James Version of the Bible to be reliable and trustworthy. While there are a variety of views within the KJVO movement, the basic idea is simple: no other Bible will do.

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