The King James Only Controversy

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What is it?

The KJVO controversy is about whether Christians should consider only the King James Version of the Bible to be reliable and trustworthy. While there are a variety of views within the KJVO movement, the basic idea is simple: no other Bible will do.

The King James Only movement is largely built on the claim that modern Bibles are doctrinally corrupt…that they have strayed from responsible and accurate translation of the Greek texts. There are a variety of other claims in the movement. Here are a few:

  • The KJV is the only true word of God.
  • The KJV is the only English translation that can be trusted.
  • The KJV contains no errors.
  • The KJV was supernaturally translated by God.
  • The KJV is more perfect than the manuscripts from which it was translated.
  • The KJV contains no errors or problems with translation.
  • To understand God’s Word, everyone on earth should learn English…so they can read the KJV.
  • Any deviation from the KJV is wrong, and may create doctrinal errors.
  • Translators (and possibly readers) of modern Bibles have a sinister ulterior motive.
  • Modern Bibles are a perversion of God’s Word.
  • Modern Bibles like the NASB and NIV are part of a satanic conspiracy to lead the world astray.
  • People who use other Bibles are not Christians.

Which KJV?

There are a number of different versions of the King James Version. Most KJVO advocates do not use the version finished in 1611, but the Blayney version from 1769. Between the two are revisions from 1613, 1629, 1638, and 1762. After many years of discussing this issue, no KJVO person has suggested to me that one is better than the other. This is a serious problem for their point of view, as each differs from the others.

Errors in the KJV

Most KJVO advocates claim that the KJV is better than all other Bibles because it alone is without error. This is absurd, and demonstrably false. The errors in the KJV are too numerous to list here, but it only takes one error to prove them wrong. I’ve made note of a few that should be persuasive for anyone willing to consider the evidence. Unfortunately, I’ve never met a KJVO advocate that was willing to consider the evidence…they usually run away from it. If you’re a KJVO person who wants to discuss the evidence, please leave a comment!

Unicorns

Most adults realize that unicorns don’t really exist. KJVO advocates must overlook the nine times that the word “unicorn” appears in the KJV: in Numbers 23:22, Numbers 24:8, Deuteronomy 33:17, Job 39:9, Psalm 22:21, Psalm 29:6, Psalm 92:10, and Isaiah 34:7 (read on Biblegateway). The Hebrew word is RE-EM, and probably means an auroch or other, now extinct, wild bull.

Easter / Passover

In Acts 12:4, the KJV mistranslates Pascha as Easter, rather than Passover. I’ve written more about this in Easter in the KJV.

Jupiter/Zeus, Mercury/Hermes

In Acts 14:12, the KJV says that the people in Lystra called Paul “Mercury” and Barnabas “Jupiter”. This is in spite of the fact that the Greek uses the words “Zeus” and “Hermes”. (read on Blue Letter Bible)

Don’t trust the demons

In Acts 16 we read about a young lady, possessed by a demon, who followed Paul and Silas. The demon – according to the KJV – said that they were servants of the most high God, which shew unto us the way of salvation. Unfortunately, this is simply wrong. The Greek (the original language of the New Testament) doesn’t say “the way of salvation.” It says “a way of salvation.” The Greek word is Hodos, which means “a way” (see the definition in context). The demon wasn’t agreeing that Paul and Silas taught the only way to be saved…it suggested that they taught one of many ways. The King James is simply inaccurate here.

Listen to the KJV translators

Most Bibles have a preface, in which the translation team explains their motives and methodology. The KJV is no different. The 1611 version of the KVJ had an extensive preface, removed from later versions. Read the full preface. In it, the translators themselves demolish the KJVO controversy:

  • They didn’t intend to make a new translation, but to improve on previous ones
  • They acknowledged that previous Bibles were “the word of God” despite containing “imperfections and blemishes”
  • They wrote that translations will never be infallible.
  • They noted the supremacy of the original manuscripts over any translation
  • They wrote that one should not object to the continual process of correcting and improving English translations of the Bible
  • They were often unsure how to translate specific words or phrases
  • They did not always translate the same Greek or Hebrew words into the same English words

Questions and Objections

But the NIV takes out stuff

The primary target of KJVO folks is the New International Version (NIV). Their claim is that the NIV translators have removed crucial words and phrases from the Bible, undermining God’s word and leading unwitting people astray. There is a very serious flaw in this argument: they invariably use the KJV as the standard. Any word or phrase that differs from the King James is then suspect.

Is this logical? Of course not. The KJV translators themselves would object to this method. They would never consider the KJV to be the standard by which all future Bibles should be judged. Instead, they would recommend exactly what the NIV translators have done: go back to the manuscripts, in their original languages, and try to improve on the Bibles that already exist.

Trickery: comparing the KJV and NIV

The KJVO folks like to compare verses side by side, to show how the NIV (or other Bible) differs from the “right Bible” – that is, the KJV. That seems reasonable, on the surface. It’s a serious problem, however. It presumes that the KJV is always right, and that other Bibles are corrupt because, well, they’re not the KJV. The proper approach is not to compare one translation or version with another, but to compare all of them with all available ancient manuscripts.

There are more scholarly ways to describe this controversy, involving more complex considerations like different manuscript families, formal vs dynamic equivalence, and so on. This article is meant as an overview…a summary of the controversy and why I believe the KJVO folks have no real argument. If you have specific questions, feel free to ask them.

What I am NOT saying

I am not suggesting that there is anything wrong with the King James Version of the Bible. In fact, I recommend it. One could read the KJV and learn all they need to know about being in a right relationship with God. I’m not criticizing the KJV here. I’m only criticizing the idea that the KJV is in any way superior to every other quality Bible. I agree with the KJV translators: it’s good, but not perfect. Those who claim that the KJV is better than any other Bible must not only claim it, but also demonstrate it. Simply put: they cannot.

Easter in the KJV

Is the Bible true? Are Bible translations bad? What language is the Bible?

2011 is the 400 year-anniversary of the publication of the King James Bible…so it’s getting a lot of well-deserved attention these days. One kind of attention, however, isn’t so good. The “King James Only” movement exalts the KJV above all other Bibles.

What’s the big deal, you say? You say that it doesn’t seem like preferring one Bible over another is a problem. You’re right. If that’s all it was, nobody would care.

Instead, the KJO movement makes some outlandish statements about God, the Bible, and the King James. It’s not a monolithic movement, so you’ll find that some are more “out there” than others. Here’s a sampling of the kinds of things that KJO folks believe:

  • The King James Version is the only legitimate English Bible.
  • The King James Version was supernaturally translated by God.
  • The King James Version is more accurate than the original Bible manuscripts.
  • The King James Version contains no errors.
  • The King James Version is the only Bible in the world that can be trusted.

Not all KJO advocates believe all of that, of course. Some simpy believe that it’s the most accurate English Bible, and consider it only marginally better than other Bibles. Others believe that to read any other Bible is to take part in a satanic conspiracy to remove the truth from the Gospel story.

Now you can see the problem. It’s a cultic movement.

Any honest and curious student can find that there are errors in the King James Versions of the Bible. That does NOT mean that God’s Word has been compromised, of course…only that the KJO position is based in ignorance. All it takes to show that the KJV is not flawless is a single error. Here’s one of dozens, from Acts 12:4…

And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to four quaternions of soldiers to keep him; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people.

What’s the problem with that? Simple: “Easter” should read “Passover”. That’s the proper translation of PASCHA, which agrees with verses like Matthew 26:2, Matthew 26:17, Matthew 26:18, Matthew 26:19, Mark 14:1, Mark 14:12, Mark 14:14, Mark 14:16, Luke 2:41, Luke 22:1, Luke 22:7, John 6:4, John 11:55, and so on.

I could point to many more examples, but there’s no need. Those who exalt the KJV do so because they don’t know better, or because they refuse to see the truth. Those who don’t know better can look at even a single example and know what’s going on, but those who refuse to see the truth can gloss over 50 such errors without blinking.

I sincerely hope you’re willing to look at the evidence. I’ll post other examples, in case you’re not convinced. KJO folks are notoriously loyal to their point of view, so you should know that I’ve never convinced one of them to drop the nonsensical view that the KJV is flawless. In fact, I lost a Facebook friend just this morning over this very post. He didn’t want “strife” on his page, so he removed me. I would prefer that he do a little homework and see that he’s been leading people astray, but I’m not sure he’s willing.

I’m down a friend. If you’d like to be my friend on Facebook, I promise to continue doing what I’m doing. =)